Guttered

Jerry Sedgewick, the director of Prevail News, created a documentary on chronic homelessness. The trailer follows:

A scientist learns from surprising homeless stories and spends night at feared shelter to experience “homeless” trauma. From his experience, he puts two and two together to determine that changes in DNA must occur among homeless, a phenomenon yet to be validated by researchers. Yet research data for trauma and genetic changes affecting behavior is piling up: is that why so many people who sleep on our streets find homelessness inescapable? 

Guttered is a documentary about being trapped in a life of homelessness. Jerry experiences homelessness first hand and navigates his way through the system. Interviews with former street survivors provide background and insight on the difficulties in getting out of the homeless system, even after finding transitional housing.

One formerly homeless man describes how becoming homeless “gets in your DNA.” As a result of his comment, Jerry also explores the role of behavioral epigenetics. If homelessness is a traumatic experience, then it follows that some alteration of genetic expression would be a result.

The point of the documentary is to urge government officials to provide housing within a month of homelessness. Otherwise, expect chronic homelessness at a much higher cost.

See more in our FAQ section.

WHO IS AFFECTED BY HOMELESSNESS

Everyone faces the possibility of homelessness, but many of us have solid relationships in families and communities that would prevent such a thing from happening. The possibility of homelessness faces some populations more than others. The following populations are more likely to be homeless:

  • Veterans
  • Formerly Incarcerated Individuals
  • Foster Home Children
  • Children of Homeless Persons
  • The Mentally Ill

The populations above are also more prone to have experienced trauma. The combination of trauma and homelessness leads to decision-making that defies what we might see as common sense decisions: executive function often gets left behind.

See more on the FAQ page.

FILM CREDITS

Director, Writer, Filmmaker: Jerry Sedgewick
Key Street Survivor and Inspiration: Daniel Velner